Whit Ayres, June 23

Whit Ayres’ comments in The Washington Post regarding President Trump’s approach on trade and immigration:

That means most of the midterm action is taking place in contested, Republican-held House districts and a couple of swing states, such as Florida and Nevada, where Trump’s rhetoric has wedged members of his party into a most uncomfortable position — between his own high popularity among Republicans on one hand and swing voters opposed to his bellicosity on trade and immigration on the other.

“It probably helps Republicans running against Senate incumbents in the deepest red states but makes life more challenging for Republican incumbents in more-diverse suburban districts,” said Whit Ayres, a Republican pollster.

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Whit Ayres, June 19

Whit Ayres’ comments on the Trump Administration border detention policy was cited as The New York Times‘ Quote of the Day:

“Somehow I don’t think that putting kids in cages is likely to go over very well with suburban moms,” said Whit Ayres, a Republican pollster uneasy about running on the culture wars. Mr. Ayres said his party should campaign on “the concrete accomplishments of a Republican-held government.”

“A fabulously strong economy, a record stock market, ISIS defeated and a world without any major wars that are killing lots of Americans on a weekly basis,” he said, laying out the case.

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Whit Ayres, April 11

Whit Ayres’ comments for Frontline on the role partisanship in defending a sitting president:

Political scientists said that limited criticism is normal from a president’s own party. Some made parallels to the debate among Republicans over whether to defend President Ronald Reagan following the Iran-Contra scandal. Whit Ayres, a Republican political consultant, noted that Democrats in Congress stood by President Bill Clinton during his own controversies.

“Democrats during the Clinton impeachment rallied around Bill Clinton, defended him resolutely and defended his conduct and behavior or at least minimized his conduct and behavior,” he said.

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Whit Ayres, February 22

Whit Ayres’ comments about President Trump and the Republican party were prominently featured in Newsweek, including this observation:

“Virtually every president’s job approval has been driven by the state of the economy,” Ayres points out, but Trump “has severed the traditional link between presidential job approval and economic well-being.” That lends some credence to the president’s argument that he doesn’t get sufficient credit for the economy, though he may be the one who prevents that credit from being tendered. Trump “keeps distracting people from all the good news with his various tweets and conflicts and battles,” Ayres says. “President Trump’s job approval is being driven by his conduct and behavior in office.”

For the full article and additional quotations, please click here.

Whit Ayres, January 29

Whit Ayres’ comments in The Daily Caller on Republican electoral prospects in the face of changing demographics:

Republican pollster Whit Ayres points out that President Bush got 44 percent of the Hispanic vote in 2004, including a majority of Sunbelt Hispanics. “It’s no coincidence that he was the last Republican nominee for president to win a majority of the vote (in 2004),” Ayers says. “The changing demographics of the country demand Republicans do better with Hispanics if they hope to win nationally. The numbers are the numbers.”

Trump won the presidency with 46.2 percent of the vote, less than the 47.2 percent Mitt Romney got in 2012, when he lost the presidency.

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Whit Ayres, December 22, NPR

Whit Ayres appeared on NPR’s All Things Considered to discuss President Trump’s job approval:

To read the transcript, please click here.

Whit Ayres, October 25

Whit Ayres’ comments in The Wall Street Journal regarding factions in the Republican party:

“Both Sens. Corker and Flake have played important roles in the governing-conservative part of the Republican Party,” said Whit Ayres, a longtime Republican pollster. “Losing them is a major problem for those of us who want a center-right coalition to function effectively.”

For now, Mr. Ayres said, the two camps in the party—the Trump forces and the party establishment—need each other and need to find a way to work together. “Neither faction,” he said, “is large enough either to win elections alone or to govern alone.”

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Whit Ayres, October 12

Whit Ayres’ comments in USA Today regarding President Trump and Senate Republican leaders:

Whit Ayres, a veteran Republican pollster, said he’s seen “nothing in my career that has approached this level of internecine warfare.”

“Everybody’s frustrated,” he said. “The president is frustrated. Senators and congressmen are frustrated. It seems to be very difficult to develop a majority coalition for much of anything so far.”

“Donald Trump has split the Republican party in two: the people who consider themselves more supporters of Donald Trump than of the Republican Party and the people who consider themselves more supporters of the Republican Party than of Donald Trump,” said Ayres, the Republican pollster.

“But neither wing of the party can win elections or govern without the other,” he said.

To read the full article, please click here.

Whit Ayres, October 11

Whit Ayres’ comments in The Hill on the role of the President in the legislative process:

But the fear among many in the GOP is that Trump’s eagerness to get into the fray ultimately hurts himself — and his party’s agenda.

“I’m sure there are a lot of people who could play their roles more effectively,” said Ayres. “But as Harry Truman said about the presidency: The buck stops here.”

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Whit Ayres, September 27

Whit Ayres’ comments in The Washington Post regarding Donald Trump’s effect on Republican primaries:

Moore is now 70 years old and was twice suspended as the chief justice of the Alabama Supreme Court for refusing to obey laws he saw as at odds with his religious beliefs. Normally all this would be career-ending. But that was before the Age of Trump. “What Donald Trump has done,” said Republican pollster Whit Ayres, “is embolden the Roy Moores of the world.”

To read the full article, please click here.